Saturday 5th September, 3-4pm
Zoom webinar & Facebook live stream

Our virtual assembly was part of Highland Doors Open Day. Wasps’ Inverness Creative Academy were delighted to present an online discussion with past pupils, Dorothy Mein (née Steele) and David Henderson (1954-1960), from Inverness Royal Academy during it’s period at Midmills.  

The discussion was chaired by former pupil and teacher Charles Bannerman who has written four books about the school’s history at Midmills. This year our building celebrated its 125th anniversary, since opening as Inverness Royal Academy in 1895 and this event will include personal reminiscence about the school’s key characters, memorable classes and antics from the 1950s – 1970s. 

“The Midmills Building has now played a prominent educational and cultural role within Inverness for a century and a quarter and it’s great that the latest custodians of that heritage, Wasps, are so committed to maintaining that tradition and celebrating the building’s past. I hope this online exercise will give a revealing and entertaining insight into what life was like within its walls in its original role of housing Inverness Royal Academy.” Charles Bannerman

Charles Bannerman was a pupil at Inverness Royal Academy from 1965-71 and, having graduated in chemistry from Edinburgh University in 1975, returned to teach the subject at the school two years later, remaining there until he retired in 2013. His ‘Up Stephen’s Brae’ series of publications, dating from 1995 – 2013, engagingly chart the decades at Midmills and are a fantastic record of the school’s history. Alongside teaching Charles has had a parallel career in sports journalism and broadcasting as well as a lifelong interest in athletics and several spells coaching with Inverness Harriers. 

#RealAcademy

Photo credit: Sixth year geography class, Inverness Royal Academy, 1962, courtesy of the Andrew Paterson Collection and Am Baile

Our heritage programme is supported by The National Lottery Heritage Fund
HLF logo in Gaelic

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